Monday, August 17, 2009

You May Say I'm A Dreamer...

I'm an egalitarian. That means I like the idea of removing inequalities among people. I haven't quite figured out why the place and circumstances of my birth and background should entitle me to more of the world's wealth or resources or health care than most of the world receives. If you read here often, you know this about me. If you don't...you may be thinking I'm a socialist. Political pigeon-holing aside, I'm really just a dreamer. I generally believe in good triumphing over evil, in right making up for wrong, and in the basic human leaning toward taking care of one another. Consequently, I believe this is a good idea:
... provide affordable, quality health care for all Americans and reduce the growth in health care spending.
It's the stated purpose of House Resolution 3200 - the bill Congress is pondering and Americans are shouting about from town hall to shining town hall meeting. Read it before you jump into a chest-pounding debate over it. If you don't have time for 1,017 pages of legislative-lawyer-speak, there's a reliable summary, posted at congress.org. If you'd rather hit the high points of contention, at least get the facts right. You could start with factcheck.org's Seven Falsehoods About Health Care. I also believe this is a wise and very democracy-grounded American opinion:
I don’t believe anyone should be in charge of your health care decisions but you and your doctor — not government bureaucrats, not insurance companies.
Barack Obama said it. Read his op-ed piece from the New York Times yesterday. I'm also a fan of the public option piece of health care reform. How in the world could this be un-American?
The public option would be a government-backed plan available to consumers through a health exchange where people could buy insurance, public or private, that best fits their needs. While a public plan might require some government financing to start up, the idea is for it to be financially self-sustaining and require no subsidies. (Some) argue that a public plan would invariably drive private insurers out of business and prompt employers to drop private coverage, pushing people who are already insured onto a plan run by the government.
If you're still confused about what I believe... Follow the money, my friends. Corporate America is not egalitarian. Peace.

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